Extensive fields of 15-foot tall Phragmites occupy the shores of Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron. In the foreground, fast-growing poplars mark the higher ground. [All photos by the authors, except aerial views by Above All Photography]

Emergent Shorelands of the Great Lakes

Along the shallower shores of the Great Lakes, new lands that have emerged over decades are now inundated again by rising waters. As the climate grows more volatile, dramatic fluctuations at the water’s edge reveal zones of opportunity for landscape designers and planners.

Dramatic fluctuations at the water’s edge create zones of opportunity for landscape designers and planners.

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  • Belmont Freeman
  • Barbara Penner
  • Simon Sadler
  • Alan Thomas

Belmont Freeman

Belmont Freeman is a columnist for Places. He is principal of Belmont Freeman Architects, an award-winning design firm in New York City.

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Barbara Penner

Barbara Penner is a columnist for Places. She is Senior Lecturer in Architectural History at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL.

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Simon Sadler

Simon Sadler is a columnist for Places. He teaches the history and theory of architecture, design, and urbanism across several programs at the University of California, Davis, where he is a professor in the Department of Design.

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Alan Thomas

Alan Thomas is a columnist for Places. He is Editorial Director for the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Chicago Press and a photographer specializing in urban landscape.

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