Concrete Utopia

Forged in the tumultuous aftermath of World War II, the republic of Yugoslavia lasted barely half a century before disintegrating amidst political and ethnic conflicts. A new exhibition offers a rigorous and revealing survey of an extraordinary built legacy, from social housing to war memorials, that until now has been neglected by mainstream architectural historians.

The republic of Yugoslavia lasted barely half a century. A new exhibition and book reveal an extraordinary architectural legacy that until now has been neglected by mainstream historians.

Read

Galleries

Columnists

  • Simon Sadler
  • Belmont Freeman
  • Keith Eggener

Gabrielle Esperdy

Gabrielle Esperdy is a columnist for Places. She is associate professor of architecture at the New Jersey Institute of Technology.

Recent Articles

Simon Sadler

Simon Sadler is a columnist for Places. He teaches the history and theory of architecture, design, and urbanism across several programs at the University of California, Davis, where he is a professor in the Department of Design.

Recent Articles

Belmont Freeman

Belmont Freeman is a columnist for Places. He is principal of Belmont Freeman Architects, an award-winning design firm in New York City.

Recent Articles

Keith Eggener

Keith Eggener is a columnist for Places. He is Marion Dean Ross Professor of Architectural History at the University of Oregon.

Recent Articles

Series